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Some people want to know if bail bonds are just a legal requirement under the laws of each state or are they a Constitutional right?

It is a right under the Constitution, said Roger Sayegh, owner of Roger Sayegh Bail Bonds in LA.

The 8th Amendment to the Constitution, part of the Bill of Rights, clearly spells this out. “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”

“You have the right to bail. You have the right to be released from jail on a bail bond, Mr. Sayegh said. “Our Founding Fathers specifically included that in the Bill of Rights because they know what it was like to be arrested and jailed with no chance to get out.”

Bail can still be denied under unusual or exceptional circumstances. This is a very rare occurrence, Mr. Sayegh said.

“You have to be a real ‘flight risk’ or have committed a truly horrible crime. Even then you have a right to go before a judge and request bail. The judge has to hear your side and hear the prosecution’s side before denying your bail request,” he said.

The great majority of the time, bail is granted. California law allows people who cannot post their bail to contract with a bail bondsman, who then posts bail on their behalf. The law also says how much the bail bond company can charge.

“That goes back to the 8th Amendment. Regulating how much the bail company can charge is preventing ‘excessive bail’ under the 8th amendment,” he said. “So if you need a bail bond, you’re going to pay the same no matter the company. What you are really looking at is the customer service the company provides.”

Roger Sayegh Bail Bonds is continually ranked very high in customer satisfaction surveys.

 

For more information about bail bonds, visit www.rogersayeghbailbonds.com or call (844) 224-9991.

Contact:   Roger Sayegh
                  965 N. Vignes St.
                  Los Angeles, CA 90012                

Tel:            844.224.9991

Email:        rogerbailagent@gmail.com     

 

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